Friday, April 18, 2014

Mommy & Me Crocheted Hats – 30 fun & stylish designs for kids of all ages

By Kristi Simpson


By now, if you've been reading my posts, you must know that I believe that one can never have too many books! (And yarn, and hooks, etc.) Well, I came across another book that I know would be a good addition to your crochet library – it has everything in it that you need to know when you crochet – from the beginning info like how to hold your crochet hook, and how to hold your yarn, all the way through to how to fasten off and weave in ends. On the way you'll find out how to change colors, how to do the stitches, how to read directions, etc., etc., etc. You get what I mean? Just about everything you need to know! And, the patterns in this book that you will be working on when you're learning all this are just adorable! They're hats – for kids and adults, boys and girls, men and women, mommy (and daddy) and me. There are 30 separate hat designs, and each hat is worked and written up in different sizes. So you can make these hats for all ages, and both men and women. And while you crochet the hat patterns, you'll also be learning different stitch patterns that you can use in other designs. So you're getting a lot of bang for your buck.
This is the book:
Mommy & Me Crocheted Hats – 30 fun & stylish designs for kids of all ages
By Kristi Simpson



Here are some of the stitches you'll learn from this book:
Puff stitches
Front post and back post stitches
Crochet cables
Basket weave patterns
Bobble stitches

And here are some of the techniques you'll learn:
How to crochet in the back loop only
How to decrease
How to carry the yarn up a row, without ending off, when you change colors at the end of a row
How to change colors
How to crochet in the round to form a circle
How to add a visor to a hat
How to crochet cables
How to crochet a basketweave pattern
How to work hats from the top down, or from the bottom up, or in panels
How to work with yarn that's both thick and thin in different places

You'll learn and practice these skills, stitches, and more while creating these adorable hats for everyone.

These are some of my favorites:
Basketweave Beanie




Gone Huntin' Camo Cap



Downtown Girl Slouchy


Groovy Waves Beanie


You Have My Heart Beanie


Hooded Scarf


Twisted Stitches Beanie


Sweetheart Sunhat



And these fun hats:
Daddy's Bearded Dude Beanie


I'm an Elf! Pixie


Giggle Monster


Ahoy Matey! Pirate Hat


Sock Monkey Twist




Aren't these the cutest hats?
Oh, one other thing – those models? They are real people, not models. So you can see what each hat looks like on real people!
(All these pictures were provided by the publisher - Stackpole Books.)


Have you every crocheted a hat? Did you start at the top and work down, at the bottom and work up, or crochet it in one or more panels? Which of these hats would you like to make first? Leave a comment about which of the hats you like, or how you prefer to crochet hats and why, and you may just win yourself a copy of this book. You'll have until April 24th, 2014, to enter. I'll use a random number generator to pick the winner.
Be sure to leave your email address so I can contact you if you win.
And have fun crocheting hats!
Oh - if you want to, you can purchase a copy of this book right here - Stackpole Books

Disclaimer: My review copy and the giveaway copy of this book were both supplied by Stackpole Books.


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Going Around in Circles

What do you do when you want to relax, crochet, chill out, and play with yarn?
All at the same time. And you don't have a lot of the yarn you want to play with. But you want to make something. And not stress out about it. What do you do?

I know what I do. I crochet circles. Some of the circles I use as small table pads, to protect tables or other surfaces from things that may scratch them. My grandmother made doilies for this purpose – I make my version of doilies. Circles. Many of the circles, though, I turn in to baskets. All sizes, all shapes, all styles. It doesn't matter if I have enough of one yarn – I just use what I have, and if I want a larger basket, I add more yarn – maybe same colorway, maybe not. Sometimes, I even make totes – same guidelines as the baskets. In fact, I'm working on one now. More on that later.

I use all sorts of yarn Рwool, cotton, acrylic, parachute cord, torn up material, ribbon made from t-shirts and other cotton material, torn up cotton bandanas, nylon cord̩, recycled sari silk ribbon, shoelace yarn, string, mop cotton, rope, etc. If it can be wound around a crochet hook, I will try it!

So what do I do with all my baskets? Just look around my house and you'll find out. In my kitchen, I have a soft basket filled with my Keurig K-pods; a couple of felted baskets with pens and pencils in them; some smaller ones hold rubber bands and paper clips; others hold loose change; another one holds small note pads near the phone. Walk into my family room, you'll see more baskets. Big ones. These baskets, some felted, one crocheted with cut-up bandanas, another crocheted with what I call mop cotton, I use to hold yarn and yarn projects that I am working on. They're convenient, because I can just sit down at the couch, decide which project I want to work on, and all my materials are there – yarn, hooks, measuring tape, scissors – whatever I need, I just put in each basket. And if I want to move to another room with the project, I just carry the basket with me. Some smaller baskets I use to put a skein or ball of yarn in, so it won't roll around on the floor and get dirty when I'm crocheting with it.  You get the idea. One can never have enough baskets!
Here are some pictures of some of them:






What about the circles/doilies? I make circles when I don't have a lot of yarn to use. Or I want to try out a yarn. Or I want to take a project with me when I'm going someplace, but it has to be a small project. So I make all sizes of circles. Small ones are great coasters. I have some in the family room so I can put a drink on them when I'm crocheting. Some larger ones are in my kitchen, protecting the countertop from marks and scratches. I use felted wool ones for hot pads on the table, so the tables don't get scorched by hot dishes or pots And, pretty soon, I just might decorate my cabinets with some circles of all sizes. And colors. And materials.
Here are some of the circles:




 Here is one of my newest baskets that I also use as a tote:


Circles are the basis of most of my baskets. But they are also the basis of a lot of my totes and hats. And I keep thinking up new ways to make circles. So I make more and more. I thought of some new ones this week, and I'm going to work on them later. And right now, if you want to learn how to make circles – all sorts of circles – you have a couple of choices. You can take my class on circles – I call it Going Around in Circles – this July at the Crochet Guild of America's Chain Link Conference in Manchester, New Hampshire, July 23 – 27, 2014, http://www.knitandcrochetshow.com. I'll be teaching how to crochet circles every which way – from the center out, from the outside in, in pieces, parts of circles, joined rounds, unjoined rounds, etc. And how to turn those circles in to baskets or totes or hats. So if you're curious about my newest tote project that I mentioned above, I'll be bringing it to the class, and you can see it there. Resigtration opened today, so head over there to sign up before the classes are full. Going Around in Circles - I'm teaching it on Thursday  1:00 to 4:00. You can also order an ebook from Interweave Crochet – Step by Step Guide to Top Down Hat Construction -  http://www.interweavestore.com/a-step-by-step-guide-to-top-down-hat-construction-with-6-staff-favorite-patterns-ebook. It includes an article written by me for Interweave Crochet, about how to crochet circles and turn them into hats. Either one would be a good choice. Both would be the best choice!
So have fun making circles with all those single skeins you've collected, and I hope to see you this July in Manchester!



Saturday, February 8, 2014

Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets
by Sharon Silverman

A few weeks ago on Ravelry, in a discussion about pattern testers and tech editors, I posted a comment. The people who were discussing this seemed to be using the two terms interchangeably, and I wrote that they were two very different things. One of the people who had posted some comments, messaged me later, thanked me for posting, and asked me if I would like to join her blog tour for her new book – Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets . Yes, it was Sharon Silverman! When I said that I would love to review her new book (little did she know that I had some of her other books – Tunisian Crochet, Crochet Scarves, Basic Crocheting, and Beyond Basic Crocheting - and thought they were good ones to have in my library), she wrote me back and told me that one of the first classes she took at a Crochet Guild of America Chain Link conference was one of mine, and she really liked it. I was a big inspiration, she said. So now I can brag about that!!! 

She sent me an eBook of her new Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets book, and also said that I could have a raffle so one of my readers could win a copy of the book. So this might be your lucky day. Read on to the end, and you'll find out what you have to do to win a copy – an eBook or a "regular" book, your choice.

Sharon is one of the "stars" of Tunisian Crochet, and her newest book certainly shows that. Eight baby afghans, each one a different Tunisian technique, each one a different Tunisian stitch or combination of stitches. The blankets are Basket Weave Blocks (Tunisian Knit Stitches alternating with Tunisian Purl Stitches), Purple Garden (in Tunisian Full Stitch - one of my now favorite Tunisian stitches), Frosted Stitch Stripes (clusters and Tunisian Simple Stitch), Color Waves (Tunisian Simple Stitch worked in ripples – another one of my now favorite Tunsiain Stitch patterns), Bubbling Bobbles (yes – the bobbles are Tunisian stitches), Telegram (Tunisian Extended stitches - also one of my now favorites), Cables and Honeycombs (yes, they're also Tunisian Stitches), and Bright Strands (using colorwork with Tunisian Simple stitches). So if you want a project that doesn't have shaping, is just square or rectangular, and will teach you the basics and more about Tunisian crochet, this is the book for you!



Now – a little background to this story I'm telling. And why I like to collect books. I teach crochet at my local yarn shop. The class is ongoing, and people can join it at any time. I don't teach a single project or technique. What each student works on is up to each student. I'm there to help them with their current project, or to teach them what they want to know or what they need to know. Sometimes I suggest that they learn something that I think they'll enjoy, or need to add to their crochet skills (think Foundation Stitches). Sometimes one of them will ask me to teach them how to do some technique or pattern, and others often chime in and say they want to learn how to do that, too, and sometimes I say how about learning how to do a special technique or pattern. Or I talk to them about something they should know about – yarns, hooks, gauge swatches, etc. 

So what does this all have to do with Tunisian? Well, just lately, I've been teaching Tunisian stitches to my class, because many of them decided that they wanted to learn the technique. I lend them Tunisian hooks if they don't have one, they start with worsted weight yarn, and I teach them the Tunisian Simple Stitch (TSS). Then I go to the Tunisian Knit Stitch (TKS). From there, I teach the Tunisian Double Stitch (TDS). That's usually enough for the first one or two classes. When I was going around the table a few weeks ago, to check on their swatches, one student said her swatch for the TKS didn't look like the other students' swatches. I looked at what she did, and it was the Tunisian Full Stitch (TFS). I knew the "proper" name of the stitch because I had looked at Sharon's book the day before. And I was going to tell the class about this new book that I thought they would like. But first, I told the student who did the TFS that she didn't make a mistake, she was just  doing another stitch. So I explained the TFS to the students, and then class was over. I didn't get to tell them about the book. But, one of the students tried making a TFS swatch at home during the week, and showed it to me at the next class. It was the TFS, but the swatch was not a rectangle, it was slanting to one side. (It was easiest to see the slant from the back of the swatch.) I had to remember how to work the TFS so it wouldn't bias to one side, and could tell her how to fix her swatch. I thought I knew, but I wanted to make sure before I told everyone how to do it wrong. Luckily, I had my iPad with me, so I looked up Sharon's Tunisian Baby Afghan book in my collection of eBooks, and opened it to the Purple Garden pattern, where I found out that I was correct in my thinking. But while I was looking at the picture, I noticed how great the yarn that was used in the blanket looked in the stitch pattern. It seemed to be a variegated yarn, but it didn't pool nor did it create stripes of weird patterns. I knew that about regular Tunisian stitches and variegated yarns, but it seemed to be working with different, more advanced Tunisian stitches, also. I showed  the picture to the class. I wanted to make sure they knew that if you're working with variegated yarns, many Tunisian crochet stitches work well with those yarns.

Here's a picture of Sharon's Purple Garden Afghan:



And just to prove it, I went home and did a practice swatch with various Tunisian stitches that I found in Sharon's book. I used some Red Heart variegated that I had in my stash, and here's a picture of the swatch:


Here's a close-up of the TFS (the 4 rows in the middle).



Notice - no pooling!

Then I did a swatch with regular stitches, so I could see the difference. This is a closeup:







Not too much pooling, but I still didn't like it as much as the Tunisian swatch. Then, this week, I brought the swatches to class, and showed my students. They all liked the Tunisian stitches with the variegated yarn better than the regular crochet stitches with variegated yarn. And then, I showed them the other afghans in the book – they all oohed and aahed over them, but the two afghans that they were really interested in crocheting were the ripple afghan on the cover, and the Tunisian Full Stitch afghan - Purple Garden.
Here's another picture of the Ripple Afghan – Color Waves:



Showing the students what they could do with Tunisian crochet, and having examples of multiple stitches that they could use in various ways is one reason why I like to have books - to help me teach various techniques, and to get my students excited about learning. I also like eBooks, so I can load them on my iPad and bring them with me - without having to actually carry all the books I might need at any time. I know I show a lot of examples from books in my crochet classes. And if the pattern is something they don't want to make, I suggest they try the stitch pattern if I think they will learn something from it. And that's what I like to do with pattern books - I don't necessarily crochet the exact pattern that's in the book. Very often, I use the stitch pattern from one of those patterns in the book, and crochet my own design. I may use a stitch pattern from a sweater, and crochet a scarf. Or a shawl. Or something else.

Those two afghans that my students liked - the Purple Garden and the Color Waves - were also the ones I wanted to try first. At least the stitch patterns. But maybe the afghans, too. And I may have to make a scarf or two using the stitch patterns. Or what about a cowl? Great for this cold weather!!!

Oh, that's another thing. Since these are afghans, either square or rectangular, it doesn’t take much brain power to figure out how to alter the measurements. So you can make bigger afghans, or smaller ones, or a scarf, or shawl, or cowl, or anything rectangular or square, with the patterns. In other words, use the stitch patterns as a stitch dictionary. (In order to change the size, you would have to make a longer or shorter starting chain, using the stitch pattern multiple, which is usually easy to figure out.)

That's one reason I always say you can never have too many books!!!

Now, here's where you get the a chance to win the book.
If you comment here, and tell me which afghan YOU would make, or what you would use the stitch pattern(s) for, you will be entered into a drawing for a free copy of this book, Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets - either the eBook or the regular book. You must comment before Friday, February 14, at midnight, Eastern Time. Also, please let me know how to contact you. I'll use a random number generator to pick a winner. 

And one more thing – if you're interested in buying the book so you can improve your skills at Tunisian Crochet, or learn some new stitch patterns, – you can get it from amazon.com , or leisurearts.com.  And you can find out more about Sharon on her web site: www.SharonSilverman.com.



Friday, January 17, 2014

HOOKS, BOOKS, AND YARNS

Hooks, Books, and Yarns

There are 3 things you pretty much need if you are going to crochet.
1: You need yarn. Or something like yarn. Something you can wrap around a crochet hook (the Number 2 thing – more about that later). Something like yarn can be string, material cut or torn in strips, leather strips, rope, shoe laces, twine, wire….. you get the idea. Something you can wrap around a crochet hook.
2: You need a crochet hook. Or something that looks like a crochet hook. It should have a shaft (which can be almost any shape, as long as you can hold it) and a hook at the end. You can use your finger bent at the last knuckle – that's called finger crochet – if you want to. That's how I taught my granddaughter how to crochet. By showing her how to use her finger instead of a hook. She was all of 6 years old. (She had her first pattern published in a national magazine when she was 11!)
3: You need books. Yes – something to teach you a stitch, or instruct you how to do something, or inspire you to create your own thing.
And, you can never have too much of 1, 2, or 3. In fact, the more the better.
So that's why I have a collection of books – old ones, new ones, ebooks, and paper books. I use them as references – how do I work a certain stitch? How did I design that pattern? (Sometimes it's easier to find my pattern in the book that published it than to search for it on my computer!) I use them as inspiration – what are some things that I could do with scrap yarns? And I use them for learning – mostly for stitch patterns, but also for crochet techniques. What are different ways to join motifs as you go? Or sew motifs together? Or work Tunisian Purl stitches? Or crochet that unique stitch pattern?
So books are good. And so are hooks. And so are yarns. That's the reason I named this post "Hooks, Books, and Yarns". You can't do without them!

I want to talk today about books – and all the new ones that have been published in the past few months (okay – maybe in the past year). I have been lucky to have been asked to review some of them, and so I will.




The first one is Mollie Makes CROCHET. This is one of a series of books, like Mollie Makes WOODLAND FRIENDS, Mollie Makes CHRISTMAS, and Molly Makes FEATHERED FRIENDS, these last ones being a mixture of crochet and other crafts. I want to tell you about Molly Makes CROCHET, though, which is all crochet! And cute and colorful crochet! From pot holders to blankets, from iPad cozies to Monster Gadget Covers, from flowers to doilies, you're sure to find many things you want to crochet in this book. There are step-by-step directions (of course), and great pictures to inspire you. And if you have problems reading crochet directions, there is a section specifically addressing that. The book starts with a section "Working from patterns: Reading a written pattern" and has a big section on techniques you need to know – from choosing your hook and yarn, to finishing off your work so it doesn't unravel. It also has a large section on different stitches and stitch patterns, so if you want to learn a new stitch or technique, it's all there, from the basic stitches to the Magic Loop method of starting a round.
Whether you are a new crocheter, or a more experienced one, this book is a good choice to add to your (necessary) crochet library! The other two books – Mollie Makes CHRISTMAS and Mollie Makes FEATHERED FRIENDS, are great books for creating homemade projects using many different crafts – crochet, knitting, sewing, felting, papercraft, etc. So if you're in to those crafts, or just want to learn more about them, I do recommend these two books. And if you just want to do crochet, they do have some cute crochet patterns!
  


The next one – Crochet At Home, edited by Brett Bara – is a great resource for all things "home". As the cover states: 25 clever projects for colorful living. And they are all colorful! From afghans, pillows and baby blankets, to cushions, tea cozies, dishcloths and pot holders, these projects are great, also, for scrap yarns, even though they do call for specific yarns. They also list the weight of the yarns, so you can use what you have. And the more color, the better.  Now that the "present-making" season is over, you can crochet some easy, colorful patterns for your living space. Or get a head start on the next "present-making" season. Try it – I know you'll like it!




The last book for now – Crochet Stitch Dictionary, by Sarah Hazell – is more than just a stitch dictionary. As stated on the back cover, it's a go-to resource. It has basic information, how to get started, good tips for any level crocheter, stitch diagrams, great photos of the stitches and stitch patterns, and step-by-step instructions for the stitches and stitch patterns.  I love looking through good stitch dictionaries. That's how I get my design ideas many times. I find a stitch pattern I like, I try it out, and I think about all the possibilities. What would it look good as? A scarf? A hat? A sweater? An afghan? A tote? I looked through this book again last night, and saw a stitch pattern that I want to try or maybe modify a bit for a new project I'm doing. I think it'll work. I can't wait until the yarn arrives so I can see what it will look like. If it doesn't work, I have another stitch pattern picked out that I will try. That's what I like about this book. 200 stitch patterns!!!! And, best of all, if you like to carry your books around with you, but don't want to schlep all of them everywhere, you'll like that this book, Crochet Stitch Dictionary, and the previous one, Crochet at Home, both come in ebook versions. So you can put them on your tablet, and take them everywhere! 


All of these books are published by Interweave Press, and are available through Interweave.com, or Amazon.

What do you use to get ideas?




Tuesday, January 14, 2014

CROCHET WRAPS: Every Which Way - by Tammy Hildebrand
Your wishes come true!

If you could have a book filled with Crochet lessons, what would you want in it? I know what I would want. I have been crocheting since I was 5 years old. And I have been a professional designer/teacher for approximately the last 14 years, although I did design and sell a line of puppets way before that. But, even though I am a designer, a teacher, a tech editor, etc., etc., etc., I don't know everything about crochet. I still can learn different techniques that I haven't quite mastered. I probably have tried almost everything in the crochet world. Well, maybe not thread crochet with anything thinner than #10 threads. But, most everything else. That doesn't mean, though, that I feel competent in all techniques. I know how to join motifs "as you go", and I know a lot of ways to do it. I have one favorite way, but that doesn't work on all motifs. So I'm always looking for other "join-as-you-go" methods. I've tried Hairpin Lace and Broomstick Lace, too, but never quite got the hang of those two crochet techniques. Maybe I just didn't practice enough, because I didn't have any patterns that excited me using those techniques. Well, that's all changed now, because of one book – the book that I know you all have been looking for – the book by Tammy Hildebrand, called "Crochet Wraps: Every Which Way".

Tammy (who is a good friend of mine, by the way) is a fantastic designer! (And I would say that even if she weren't a friend.) In this book, she has 18 wraps in 6 different techniques – traditional crochet, motifs, hairpin lace, broomstick lace, Tunisian  crochet, and double-ended crochet (which is a variation of regular Tunisian crochet). For each technique, she has an easy pattern, an intermediate  pattern, and an experienced level pattern. What a great idea! The crocheter (you) can start with the first pattern (easy) in the technique, and work yourself up to the next level (intermediate), and then, finally, you'll be ready for the last level, experienced. By the time you are done, you will know a lot of the ins and outs of the technique. And have 3 fabulous shawls, in addition!

I think I'll have to start with Broomstick Lace. I really like the three shawls – 

                                                              Ardeona Lace


                                                                  Chianti

and Chica Mala


– that Tammy designed using this technique. The last one, Chica Mala, is a bunch of motifs, worked in the round, like a circle, then joined "as you go", so I'll be practicing two techniques when I make that one. And then, who knows, maybe I'll use Broomstick Lace in one of my designs! And that will be all thanks to Tammy, and her great book. By the way, it has wonderful pictures for each step of each technique, even traditional crochet. You can check out the pictures in the book here:

And before you ruin your computer keyboard (with all your slobbering over the patterns), go to:


to order it. You won't be sorry!!!

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Sweet & Simple Baby Crochet

When I was asked to join the blog tour for Sweet & Simple Baby Crochet, by Kristi Simpson, and perhaps review the book, I said "Absolutely!" I love crocheting for babies - anything from hats to afghans to swaddles (I usually call them buntings, some call them cocoons) , and I always need new ideas and projects. I don't know about you, but there always seems to be babies among my family and friends - and they always need a present or two or three. And now that Sparkle Season is getting nearer, the need for quick, cute presents is growing. And time is growing shorter and shorter. So quick projects, in worsted weight or bulkier yarns, are a necessity. And this book - Sweet & Simple Baby Crochet - is full of these kinds of projects.



You can make all sorts of projects, and put them in your Baby Gift Closet for safekeeping, until you need them. The one above, on the cover of the book, is called Elephant Ears Beanie. Can't you just see the cuteness of it! Perfect for a baby picture. 
Here are some more designs for you to crochet:


I think this one, the Fruit Punch Hat, is my favorite one. I love the look on the baby's face!

And what about this one - Emily Cluster Hat. So cute - child and hat.


And every baby needs a swaddle or bunting or cocoon - whatever you want to call it. Here's a great one to crochet first - the Peapod Hooded Cocoon.


And another one for the family with a football fan or two, the Football Cocoon and Hat Set:


One more I have to show you - the Cuddle Me Hat and Cocoon Set.



There are more - hats, cocoons, baby blankets, socks, headbands, diaper covers and more - 35 patterns in all,  for babies from newborn to 12 months. The patterns I showed here are all worked in worsted weight, or bulky, or super bulky yarns. And the yarns are readily available at craft stores.
If you're a beginner crocheter, and aren't sure how to read patterns, there is a section in the back of the book called "How to Read My Patterns". It includes everything you need to know about reading and following patterns, and what all the symbols and words mean. There are even directions on how to crochet the different basic stitches and all the techniques you need to know for these patterns, including finishing techniques. 
So if you're a beginner who wants to do more than just washcloths and scarves, or if you are an experienced crocheter who wants to do more than just the same old, same old that you've been doing for years, or if you need a quick present or presents (and don't we all), then this is the book for you!
Sweet & Simple Baby Crochet by Kristi Simpson 
And, if you post a comment on this blog about what you would like to crochet from the book, and why, then you'll be entered in a random drawing for a free copy of the book. To count, your post must be placed by midnight, October 28th, 2013 (that's one week) and you will need to make sure I can contact you if you win. 
Good luck to all, and happy crocheting!




Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Crocheter's Companion






The Crocheter's Companion
Revised and Updated
By Nancy Brown

I love books. I collect books. I use books. I recommend books. When I hear about a new crochet book, either a pattern book or a technique book or a reference book, or any kind of crochet book, I can't wait to see it, to read it, to acquire it.
I look at a crochet book in various ways: Does it have good information in it? Can I recommend it to my crochet students (who range from beginners to experienced)? Can I use it to refer to when I want some information about a technique, or some ideas and inspiration? Do I want it in my library? So when I was contacted by F&W Media, to see if I would like to review The Crocheter's Companion, Revised and Updated, by Nancy Brown, I immediately said YES! For many reasons. I have worked with Interweave Press (a division of F&W Media) before, and know that they publish well-thought-out, well-written books, by talented and experienced authors and designers. In other words, I like the books they publish! And, even though I have the first edition of The Crocheter's Companion, it would be interesting to see what changes were made in the Revised and Updated Edition.
The first edition was published in 2002. This new edition was published in 2013.
That means that about a dozen years have elapsed between editions, and in those dozen years, many changes have occurred in the crochet world – different techniques became popular, different skill sets are needed, and different language is used.
Just looking at the table of contents in the new book, and comparing it to the table of contents in the old book, I saw some major differences that I am pleased with. The old edition had only one page on Tunisian Crochet. The new edition has an entire chapter devoted to Tunisian Crochet (an old technique that's become popular again in the past few years). The new edition has information on how to read a stitch diagram, how to work foundation sc, foundation hdc, and foundation dc (it calls these stitches "chainless" sc, "chainless" hdc, and "chainless" dc), and how to work extended stitches. All of these techniques and stitches have come into the forefront in the past dozen years, so it's good that this new edition is including them.
What I really like about this book is the way it's packaged. Like the older edition, it's spiral-bound (at the top) with a hard cover. It measures about 7.5" wide x 6" tall, and opens at the top. And when you open it up, it will stay open to the page you select. It's also small in size, so you can stash it in your crochet bag and have it handy whenever and where ever you need it. (At 126 pages, it's not small in information, though!) The older edition was one book that I always recommended to my students. Now I definitely will recommend the Revised and Updated edition – it's a "must-have" for every crocheter!
Oh, one more thing that I like about this book. The Bibliography is a list of 12 books published before 2001. So if you're interested in the history of crochet, and looking at older books, this is a great reference list.
All in all, I recommend this book for all crocheters – beginners through experienced. And I'm glad I have this new revised and updated edition in my library!

Here's where you can find out more about the book – and order it for your very own library!

Interweave/F+W Media, Inc; $19.95
Barnes & Noble: bit.ly/YVSMug
Interweave: bit.ly/YkrBND